Breakthrough May Lead To Ability To Diagnose CTE In Living Football Players

Source: washingtonpost.com | Re-Post Duerson Fund 10/2/2017 – 

In one of the biggest breakthroughs to date, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have discovered a key biomarker for chronic traumatic encephalopathy that they hope marks the first step toward being able to diagnose and ultimately treat the neurodegenerative disease in a living football player.

Dr. Ann McKee, the neuropathologist credited with some of the most high-profile CTE diagnoses, said she was buoyed by the recent discovery, calling it “the first ray of hope” in a years-long effort to understand the disease.

“To me, it feels like maybe now we can start going in the other direction,” she said. “We’ve been going down, and everything has just gotten more and more depressing. And now it’s like, ‘Yeah, we’re going to actually find some answers here.’”

In a new study published Tuesday in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers from BU and the VA Boston Healthcare System studied the brains of 23 former football players who were diagnosed with CTE, in addition to those of 50 non-athletes who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease and 18 non-athlete controls. They found significantly elevated levels of a protein related to inflammation called CCL11 in the group of ex-players compared with the non-athletes. The levels were even higher in those who played the game longer.

Read the full article…